96 South Main Street, PO Box 77, Nephi, Utah 84648 - Voice: 435 623-0525 - FAX: 435 623-4735

On our front page this week

 

 

  • Sheriff presents plan to build up fleet at county meeting


By Myrna Trauntvein
TN Correspondent

It might be wise to build up the fleet for the sheriff’s office by buying rather than leasing the needed vehicles.

Doug Anderson, Juab County Sheriff, said that some new vehicles needed to be leased to replace older ones and to serve in the fleet.

“Keeping vehicles under 36,000 miles is a challenge,” said Anderson. “We have been leasing our vehicles but a rental might work better.”

He said that, since the vehicles would be rented, the sheriff’s office could not punch holes in them for the installation of equipment. However, the light bars being used would not need to be mounted in that way.

“The rental would save us $38,000 over two years rather than going with the lease agreement,” said Anderson.

Horsepower was the name of the rental company, he said. Horsepower will provide the rentals and Ken Garff has provided the lease vehicles.

“We would not need to buy tires,” said Anderson.

He had budgeted $80,000 for the vehicles, he said.

“We are getting a better deal on these trucks,” said Byron Woodland, commission chairman. “The F-150s are good trucks.”

“We have all the equipment and will stay with the F-150s,” said Anderson. “We own the equipment outright.”

Richard Hansen, commissioner, asked how long it would take to have the trucks ready to add to the fleet and Anderson said that they would be ready within a couple of weeks after they were ordered.

“Could we purchase the trucks on state bid and own them?” asked Woodland.

Hansen said that some counties do that. They buy so many a year and rotate them through.

Woodland said that they had all had that discussion in the past.

“When I became sheriff, our fleet was woefully outdated,” said Anderson. “We didn’t have the capital to buy new trucks but we do own one.”

The savings the county will have by renting, rather than leasing, would buy one truck, said Anderson. If they did that, they would rent or lease one less next year.

Gradually, the sheriff’s office could build up a fleet of vehicles that they did own and could then rotate through their own fleet.

Hansen said that the older county-owned vehicles could be sold at auction and that money could go toward purchase of new ones. The budget would always need to be planned to buy new trucks but that would be a purchase and would not be money that went to others for a lease or rental.

“We need high performance vehicles,” said Anderson.

The optimal mileage allowance is 70,000, he said.

Hansen said that F-250s have a higher resale value and are used in the oil fields. The diesel engine also has a greater resale value.

“We like the F-150 because it can get up to speed faster and is more maneuverable,” said Anderson.

Anderson said that the sheriff’s office had 11 trucks in their fleet.

Clinton Painter, commissioner, said that he would make a motion to approve the funds needed to rent the needed trucks.

John Crippen, county administrator, reminded commissioners that they could only authorize the spending of up to $80,000 from the sheriff’s budget because that was what was left.

Anderson said that what was needed for this year was $67,639.

The contract will be for two years and total $135,278 with the first year being paid from the current budget.

“If we can find you money for one more employee,” said Hansen, “you will need one more truck.”

Anderson said that he was working on a deal to provide a SRO (School Resource Officer) for Tintic School District. The superintendent of that district was willing to provide one-third of the funding.

The superintendent of the Tintic School District had wanted an SRO officer for some time.

Hansen said the officer would be needed for part of a day at the school and asked if the plan was to have the person then serve in the community.

“The superintendent said as long as there was a 180-day commitment for the SRO then the deputy could serve in the community for the time the individual was not needed at the school,” said Anderson.

It is a great benefit to students at the school, he said, as the commission had found with the contribution they make to the program in Juab School District.

The SRO salary in Juab is paid by Nephi, Juab County and the school district.

Another tangible benefit, he said, was that the SRO built trust in the community and in the school.

“It should be equitable for both schools,” said Woodland.

Scott Sorensen, jail commander, also presented a bid for a new roof top exhaust fan unit.

“It is an aging building and we would like to replace the old unit with a new one,” said Sorensen.

He said that it would take $700 to repair the current unit.

Crippen said that, unless the unit replacement was a sole source provider, the sheriff’s office would need to obtain two bids.money that went to others for a lease or rental.

“We need high performance vehicles,” said Anderson.

The optimal mileage allowance is 70,000, he said.

Hansen said that F-250s have a higher resale value and are used in the oil fields. The diesel engine also has a greater resale value.

“We like the F-150 because it can get up to speed faster and is more maneuverable,” said Anderson.

Anderson said that the sheriff’s office had 11 trucks in their fleet.

Clinton Painter, commissioner, said that he would make a motion to approve the funds needed to rent the needed trucks.

John Crippen, county administrator, reminded commissioners that they could only authorize the spending of up to $80,000 from the sheriff’s budget because that was what was left.

Anderson said that what was needed for this year was $67,639.

“If we can find you money for one more employee,” said Hansen, “you will need one more truck.”

Anderson said that he was working on a deal to provide a SRO (School Resource Officer) for Tintic School District. The superintendent of that district was willing to provide one-third of the funding.

The superintendent of the Tintic School District had wanted an SRO officer for some time.

Hansen said the officer would be needed for part of a day at the school and asked if the plan was to have the person then serve in the community.

“The superintendent said as long as there was a 180-day commitment for the SRO then the deputy could serve in the community for the time the individual was not needed at the school,” said Anderson.

It is a great benefit to students at the school, he said, as the commission had found with the contribution they make to the program in Juab School District.

The SRO salary in Juab is paid by Nephi, Juab County and the school district.

Another tangible benefit, he said, was that the SRO built trust in the community and in the school.

“It should be equitable for both schools,” said Woodland.

Scott Sorensen, jail commander, also presented a bid for a new roof top exhaust fan unit.

“It is an aging building and we would like to replace the old unit with a new one,” said Sorensen.

He said that it would take $700 to repair the current unit.

Crippen said that, unless the unit replacement was a sole source provider, the sheriff’s office would need to obtain two bids.